"The lies we want to believe tell us something about ourselves."
-- Eula Biss, Having and Being Had

Saturday, October 10, 2020

Part 1: Medicare Just Got Cheaper

     Okay, Medicare is not getting cheaper for everybody. But it is for us, because there's been a screw up. Yes, it turns out that Medicare can make a mistake, so it's best to pay attention.

     Medicare uses your 2018 tax return to figure out your Medicare premiums for 2020. If you make too much money, there's a surcharge on both your Medicare Part B and also Part D. For example, if you're single and make over $87,000 and less than $109,000, you pay a $57.80 surcharge every month for Part B, plus an extra $12.20 for Part D.

     B and I got married in 2018. Once you're married, as a couple you can make up to $174,000 per year before the first surcharge sets in.

     All this year I've been paying my basic Medicare premiums, no problem, no complaints. But this past week I decided to review our medical insurance, because open enrollment is about to begin.

     I thought I'd start by checking our Medicare payments, and that's where I found the problem. B's Medicare premiums were more than mine. She was being hit with a surcharge. That didn't seem right. We filed a joint tax return in 2018, so shouldn't our payments be the same?

     I searched the Medicare website for an answer then, finding nothing relevant, called the main Medicare number. After negotiating the phone tree and waiting 40 minutes on hold, I finally got a very nice man on the phone.

     It was a little hard to explain, but after 20 minutes of going back and forth he discovered the problem. Medicare never received B's 2018 tax information from the IRS. Medicare had mine for 2018. But not hers. Even though we filed jointly, and they were on the same tax form!

     Therefore, Medicare was using B's 2017 taxes to base her Medicare premium. She was single in 2017, and her income was over the threshold of $87,000. So she was getting a surcharge.

     The man from Medicare sent me to the IRS to straighten out the issue. After another 20 minutes on hold, I got a real person who . . . turned out to be no help. The IRS representative said I should talk to Social Security, and gave me the main number.

     By that point I could not abide sitting on hold on the telephone for another 40 minutes. So I got an idea. I found the number for our local Social Security office. A real woman answered the phone. I told her my problem, and she put me through to the man who handles these things. Surprise, surprise. He had access to our records!

     He could see the problem right away. Yes, Medicare was using B's 2017 tax form instead of the 2018 tax form to base her Medicare rate. So he told me to send him a copy of our 2018 Form 1040 along with a copy of our marriage license. And he would take care of it.

   "You'll get a refund," he said. "But it may take a while because it has to wend its way through the bureaucracy." So if everything works out, we'll get a refund of several hundred dollars; plus, B's Medicare premium should go down for 2021, because they'll be using the correct information, now from our 2019 tax form. A double win!

     He said the situation should be corrected for next year and beyond. But I should double check. When I receive the notice for my 2021 Medicare premium -- sometime around Thanksgiving -- I should check and make sure the premiums are based on our 2019 married-filing-jointly tax forms.

     The takeaway? Sometimes it's a good idea to check Medicare, especially if you've had a life-changing event in the last few years. Things change, and what you had when you turned 65 may be different by now. Also, if you have to deal with the government, don't call the main 800 number. Find a number for your Social Security office. That might save you some time and aggravation.

     We all love Medicare. And it usually works pretty well. But -- as they say -- pobody's nerfect, not even the government.

8 comments:

ApacheDug said...

Good for you guys for finding that error and getting it fixed Tom. I wonder how many out there are being overcharged and unaware? I'm a few more years from Medicare, but I've started a folder on my computer for things like this to be aware of.

DJan said...

Well, congratulations on finding that mistake and actually getting through to fix it. It will be a nice little bonus to get that money, too. I'd probably use it for something I wouldn't otherwise enjoy. :-)

Kay said...

Good for you, Tom! You made me check mine. I'm so happy for the both of you. Government can make mistakes.

Kathy @ SMART Living 365.com said...

Hi Tom! Good for you for being persistent and figuring out the problem. A lessor man would have given up and just let it go. I will definitely check Thom and I's now and pay attention to that in the future. ~Kathy

Tom said...

I hate to admit it but the thought that maybe I could write a blog post about this is part of what kept me going. But, as someone on a fixed income, it is great to save the money too!

gigi-hawaii said...

Very interesting. I should have David look into this, too, although we have been married since 1980.

Priscilla said...

I've dealt with Medicare & SSA also. I have found both depts. to be very helpful most courteous. So glad to hear you did your due diligence. It really does pay off...not a pun!

Rebecca Olkowski said...

It's all so complicated sometimes. You really have to stay on top of it, though.