Saturday, February 10, 2018

Sightings of Charleston

     I signed up for another photography class at our Center for Learning in Retirement, at home in Pennsylvania. Like the course I took last fall, the class culminates with each student presenting a portfolio of pictures centered on a particular theme.

     Since I'm in South Carolina, and not in Pennsylvania, I picked for my theme: historical Charleston.

     So here's a preview of the photos I've been taking. Of course, I'll be taking more, and culling trough them to choose the best, but this is my first effort. Any feedback you can give me -- photos you especially like, or ones you think are boring or cliches -- would be much appreciated and help me put this all together.

     We'll start out with a picture of East Bay Street, showing the elegant houses along Charleston harbor.


     And then a view across the harbor, out to Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired.


     This is a view of the First Presbyterian Church of Charleston . . . with three doors, perhaps symbolizing the holy trinity?


     And here's a view down Broad St., a main thoroughfare in Charleston, taken from the Old Exchange Building, once a slave market and prison. Notice the British flag (Charleston was named after King Charles) and the American flag with 13 stars.


     So the theme is Charleston history. Two signers of the Declaration of Independence are buried in this churchyard: South Carolina governor John Rutledge (1739 - 1800), who was rejected as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and tried to commit suicide by jumping off a wharf into Charleston harbor, and another South Carolina governor Charles Pickney (1746 - 1825) who went on to become a U. S. Senator. But I was more interested in this grave, of Margaret Charlotte Elford, 1817 - 1860. The inscription says . . .

Leaving a husband with seven young children to lament their irreparable loss
She was
In childhood obedient
In wedlock virtuous
In prosperity humble
In adversity resigned
In sickness patient
In death happy


     And here's another photo from the graveyard which I thought was interesting simply because there's a daffodil blooming, in early February!


     This rather abstract photo shows the buried-and-recovered city wall from the 1700s, visible along the top of the picture.


     And this abstract photo is a close-up of a sweetgrass basket, traditional work from the local Gullah culture, still handmade and then sold on Charleston's city streets.


     And finally, two photos showing typical, traditional Charleston features. A gated private garden . . . 


     And the side porch of a house, with the front door leading not into the house, but onto the porch -- all designed to let the sea breezes through to cool off the home.



18 comments:

DJan said...

I love the first one and the last two. :-)

Jayne said...

I enjoyed reading this -love reading about local history and seeing where people live. I liked the pics except the first two don't add as much interest as the rest.. lovely pic of the old house and the view of the main st area

Barbara said...

I've never been to Charleston so these pictures are so exciting to me. Looking forward to seeing more. Good for you taking another photography class. It is such a great talent to have.

Wisewebwoman said...

My fave is the secret garden, it pulls the viewer in. A sunny day might have improved the first one, the water too pallid along with the road/path.

This sounds like a whole pile of fun, I look forward to the rest of the photos :)

XO
WWW

Jono said...

All of them are terrific!

Cindi said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Red said...

we can find history if we only think to look for it. I think you have a great portfolio.

Bonnie said...

Excellent subject choice, there is so much character in the old south. My favorite is the garden gate. On the first one I would like to see more of the elegant houses and less of the sidewalk. The old brick work is interesting. Thanks for sharing!

Still the Lucky Few said...

#4 is my favorite—I like the way the flags frame the picture. Sounds like you are enjoying this course. Don't forget to share the highlights with us!

Rian said...

I like the last 2... don't know why, just do.

gigihawaii said...

I love photos of elegant homes.

Rebecca Olkowski said...

I've never been to Charleston but have always wanted to go. I love learning about the history of an area. Love the grave marker.

Anonymous said...

I like the garden gate, the grave stone of the mother of 7 children, and door leading unto the porch. My step daughter lives in Charleston and it is my daughter's favorite place to visit. I'm still puzzled about why you mention living in PA in your posts, but your bio says you live in NY state. - plynjyn

Tom Sightings said...

Thanks to all for your comments, and Anon., thanks for the heads up. I moved from NY to PA last year; so I will update my bio.

Anonymous said...

Tom, if you haven't tried it yet, you might want to take the boat out to Ft. Sumter - great site for pictures.

D Critchley said...

Charleston is a former home and top of list for a long weekend visit. You can learn some history of iron work down by the Liberty Square and the Fort Sumter visitor center. There is a Bio of a Charleston blacksmith and his mark on the gardens and gates of Charleston.

Also, you should highlight the interesting back story of the why the "front doors" are on the sides of the porches and it has to do with taxes imposed base on street frontage...measured by the side of the house where the front door is located.

Sally Wessely said...

That is quite a portfolio! Very nice. The tombstone sent chills up my spine with its message.

Enjoy your photography class.

Savoring Sixty said...

I wrote a comment on the previous post accidentally. I love the iron gates in Charleston, so I was attracted to photo #9. Hope you enjoyed your visit to Charleston!