Monday, August 10, 2015

Retreat to the Farm

     You only have to spend a weekend in the country (or not even that) to know that August brings every farmer way too much squash.



     But you can never have enough corn . . .



     or tomatoes.



     You surely know what this is:
 


    And you probably know that this is . . . 



     But do you know that this is a spring house? There's a stream in back of this stone structure, with a spring bubbling up into the basement.



     Yes, even a small farm is a field of dreams.



     So let the sun(flower) shine in!


16 comments:

DJan said...

Yep, August. Filled with the harvesting of our garden plants (and way too many zucchini of course), and such fine pictures, too. I've never heard of a spring house before. How cool is that? :-)

schmidleysscribblins.com said...

Lovely photos of a beautiful place. PA again?

Tabor said...

Sorry, but we usually get way too many tomatoes!

Barbara - said...

What was the purpose of the spring house I wonder? To keep things cool perhaps? I always lose some tomatoes and never have enough.

Olga Hebert said...

You have some beautiful pictures here. I personally can not get enough summer squash. And this is certainly the time of year to eat corn.

gigihawaii said...

Looks idyllic.

Mona McGinnis said...

Oh the bounty of the garden we take such pleasure in sowing. I just put some green beans in the boiler to process, the first of a few batches to be sure. a year or two ago, there was such a bounty of cucumbers that people were leaving them in the lobby of the post office for people to help themselves to. They would all be gone at the end of the day and thank goodness the powers that be at the PO didn't stop the practice.

Stephen Hayes said...

There's something wonderfully cheery about sunflowers. Thanks for sharing.

Janis said...

Since we had a few trips planned this spring, we didn't plant any tomatoes this year. But, we did get them anyway! Three "volunteer" tomato plants have been supplying us for the last two months. Now I need to find a good recipe for making and freezing tomato sauce... there are too many (a good problem to have).

Lovely pictures.

Linda Myers said...

Lovely photos! Our own garden has enormous squash and a bazillion almost-ripe grapes. I can hardly wait.

Tom Sightings said...

Yes, Dianne, south central Pa. Btw, anyone want some squash?!?

joared said...

Delightful place you have! Stone structures remind me of some scattered around our fair city, including at the end of my street. What you've pictured prompts a few stories. Also, the cool house brings to mind my dairy farmer uncle who had a similar type building that was a milk house where he kept the milk he sold.

Your produce is tempting. I delight in the generosity of vegetable growing neighbors who share their crops. I haven't grown any veggies for a while, so was delighted to receive some you've pictured from my neighbor across-the-street who replaced the grass in a section of her front yard between her drive and her neighbor's yard with a small garden.

I just noticed the name of your blog has changed since I was last here. You must have had a birthday -- belated happy! The water's fine in this decade -- really fine! Enjoy -- make the most of it. I'll change the name on my blogroll.

Barbara said...

Nice. I love a day in the country.

Retired English Teacher said...

Wonderful photos that speak of the wonder of summer.

Jono said...

In our small town you have to keep your car doors locked during the zucchini harvest. Otherwise, you just might find them waiting for you when you return.

Douglas said...

Once you plant a tomato plant, you never have to plant one again. I know because I grew some cherry tomatoes in my backyard in San Diego. I also had a garden with corn, cantaloupe, and kale. Everything thrived and then died, except the tomatoes. They kept coming back.